Posted by: Sara Shipley Hiles | June 26, 2009

NYT’s Andy Revkin’s latest post on climate bill

Here’s some context on the climate bill by NYT’s Andy Revkin, from his blog, Dot Earth. Andy seems to walk a fine line on his views on the bill. For example, he says:

As Democratic leaders work to round up  the last, toughest House votes for the  American Clean Energy and Security Act, as lobbyists and activists frenetically  fight for and  against the bill, as  Twitterers debate, it’s important to step back just a little and explore what this bill, even at its best, could accomplish.

Even if it’s  cheaper than Republican foes assert, even if provisions added to satisfy particular constituencies don’t blunt its impact on emissions, as  some worry, even if the Senate moves and President Obama signs a climate bill into law, will it matter to the climate?

… On Friday, Prime Minister  Gordon Brown of Britain gave a speech on climate in which he proposed that the rich nations ante up some $100 billion a year in such assistance by 2020.

Here’s how Mr. Brown of Britain described that challenge in his London speech (prepared text):

Success will require two major shifts in how we think – as policy makers, as campaigners, as consumers, as producers, as a society. The first is to think not in political or economic cycles; not just in terms of years or even decadelong programs and initiatives. But to think in terms of epochs and eras — and how our stewardship will be judged not by tomorrow’s newspapers but by tomorrow’s children.

And the second is to think anew about how we judge success as a society. For 60 years we have measured our progress by economic gains and social justice. Now we know that the progress and even the survival of the only world we have depends on decisive action to protect that world. In the end, without environmental stewardship, there can be no sustainable prosperity and no sustainable social justice.

He ends his post by asking, “Do you think societies are capable of such shifts?”

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